Feed aggregator

Project 'Fuchsia': Google is Quietly Working on a Successor To Android

Slashdot -

A day after the European Commission fined Google over Android, more details about Fuchsia, a new operating system the company has been working on for several years has emerged. From the report: But members of the Fuchsia team have discussed a grander plan that is being reported here for the first time: Creating a single operating system capable of running all the company's in-house gadgets, like Pixel phones and smart speakers, as well as third-party devices that now rely on Android and another system called Chrome OS, according to people familiar with the conversations. According to one of the people, engineers have said they want to embed Fuchsia on connected home devices, such as voice-controlled speakers, within three years, then move on to larger machines such as laptops. Ultimately the team aspires to swap in their system for Android, the software that powers more than three quarters of the world's smartphones, said the people, who asked not to be identified discussing internal matters. The aim is for this to happen in the next half decade, one person said. But Pichai and Hiroshi Lockheimer, his deputy who runs Android and Chrome, have yet to sign off on any road map for Fuchsia, these people said. The executives have to move gingerly on any plan to overhaul Android because the software supports dozens of hardware partners, thousands of developers -- and billions of mobile-ad dollars. [...] Still, Fuchsia is more than a basement skunkworks effort. Pichai has voiced his support for the project internally, said people familiar with the effort. Fuchsia now has more than 100 people working on it, including venerated software staff such as Matias Duarte, a design executive who led several pioneering projects at Google and elsewhere. Duarte is only working part-time on the project, said one person familiar with the company.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Lullabot: Introducing Contenta JS

Drupal Planet -

Though it seems like yesterday, Contenta CMS got the first stable release more than a year ago. In the meantime, the Contenta CMS team started using Media in core; improved Open API support; provided several fixes for the Schemata module; wrote and introduced JSON RPC; and made plans to transition to the Umami content model from Drupal core. A lot has happened behind the scenes. I’m inspired to hear of each new instance where Contenta CMS is being used both out-of-the-box and as part of a custom decoupled Drupal architecture. Both use cases were primary goals for the project. In many cases, Drupal, and hence Contenta CMS, is only part of the back-end. Most decoupled projects require a nodejs back-end proxy to sit between the various front-end consumers and Drupal. That is why we started working on a nodejs starter kit for your decoupled Drupal projects. We call this Contenta JS.

Until now, each agency had their own nodejs back-end template that they used and evolved in every project. There has not been much collaboration in this space. Contenta JS is meant to bring consistency and collaboration—a set of common practices so agencies can focus on creating the best software possible with nodejs, just like we do with Drupal. Through this collaboration, we will be able to get features that we need in every project, for free. Today Contenta JS already comes with many of these features:

  • Automatic integration with the API exposed by your Contenta CMS install. Just provide the URL of the site and everything is taken care of for you.
    • JSON API integration.
    • JSON RPC integration.
    • Subrequests integration.
    • Open API integration.
  • Multi-threaded nodejs server that takes advantage of all the cores of the server’s CPU.
  • A Subrequests server for request aggregation. Learn more about subrequests.
  • A Redis integration via the optional @contentacms/redis.
  • Type safe development environment using Flow.
  • Configurable CORS.
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Watch the introduction video for Contenta JS (6 minutes).

Videos require iframe browser support.

Combining the community’s efforts, we can come up with new modules that do things like React server-side rendering with one command, or a Drupal API customizer, or aggregate multiple services in a pluggable way, etc.

Join the #contenta Slack channel if this is something you are passionate about and want to collaborate on it. You can also create an issue (or a PR!) in the GitHub project. Together, we can make a holistic decoupled Drupal backend from start to end.

Originally published at humanbits.es on July 16, 2018.

Amazon Web Services Isn't Making a 'Commercial' Networking Switch, Cisco Says

Slashdot -

A week after a report claimed that Amazon Web Services was building its own bare-bones networking switch in a potential threat to networking giant companies, Cisco says it has checked with Amazon, with which it has long maintained a relationship, and it has been assured by the ecommerce giant that is not entering its territory. From a report: AWS CEO Andy Jassy and Cisco CEO Chuck Robbins had a "recent call" from which Robbins walked away satisfied that AWS wasn't "actively building a commercial network switch," Marketwatch reported Wednesday, citing a statement from Cisco that it confirmed as authentic with AWS. That follows a report last week from The Information that AWS was working on a so-called "white-box switch," which the site portrayed as a frontal assault on Cisco that sent networking stocks slumping on a lazy summer Friday afternoon.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Security updates for Thursday

LWN Headlines -

Security updates have been issued by Debian (ant, gpac, linux-4.9, linux-latest-4.9, taglib, vlc, and znc), Fedora (ceph), Red Hat (fluentd and qemu-kvm-rhev), Slackware (httpd), and SUSE (e2fsprogs, glibc, libgcrypt, mercurial, openssh, perl, rubygem-sprockets, shadow, and wireshark).

Trump Slams EU Over $5 Billion Fine on Google

Slashdot -

U.S. President Donald Trump on Thursday criticized the European Union and said the bloc was taking advantage of the United States, pointing to the record $5 billion fine European antitrust regulators imposed on Google. From a report: European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker is scheduled to meet with Trump at the White House next Wednesday to discuss trade and other issues. "I told you so! The European Union just slapped a Five Billion Dollar fine on one of our great companies, Google. They truly have taken advantage of the U.S., but not for long!" Trump said in a post on Twitter .

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Bye Siri, Says Apple AI's Last Remaining Founder

Slashdot -

Tom Gruber, the last of three Siri voice assistant co-founders still at Apple, has retired from his role as head of Siri's Advanced Development group, The Information reports. From a report: The 59-year-old will pursue personal interests in photography and ocean conservation, the publication said citing unnamed sources. Gruber's departure comes as the Siri group is seeing a major haul in its leadership under new boss John Giannandrea, formerly Google's head of AI and search. Dag Kittlaus and Adam Cheyer, with whom Gruber founded the original Siri Inc before it was bought over by Apple in 2010, left the iPhone maker years ago in 2011 and 2012 respectively.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Should the Word 'Milk' Be Used To Describe Nondairy Milk-Alternative Products?

Slashdot -

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration seems to have soured on nondairy milk-alternative products that use the term "milk" in their marketing and labeling -- like popular soy and almond milk products. In a talk hosted by Politico, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb announced Tuesday that the FDA will soon issue a new guidance on the use of the term. But he added that products aren't abiding by FDA policies as they stand now. He referenced a so-called "standard of identity" policy that regulates how milk is defined and should be identified. "If you look at our standard of identity -- there is a reference somewhere in the standard of identity to a lactating animal," he said. "And, you know, an almond doesn't lactate, I will confess." He went on to explain that the issue is that the agency hasn't been enforcing its own policy or putting the squeeze on product makers -- and that it's time to get abreast of the labeling language. But, he admitted, curtailing the wording of non-moo juice labeling isn't an easy task because it means that the agency has to change its "regulatory posture." "I can't just do it unilaterally," Gottlieb said. Hence, the agency is putting together a new guidance for manufacturers to help skim the fat from the market. Gottlieb said the agency will soon tap the public for comments on the terminology and hopes to wring out a new policy within a year.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Dries Buytaert: How Drupal continues to evolve towards an API-first platform

Drupal Planet -

It's been 12 months since my last progress report on Drupal core's API-first initiative. Over the past year, we've made a lot of important progress, so I wanted to provide another update.

Two and a half years ago, we shipped Drupal 8.0 with a built-in REST API. It marked the start of Drupal's evolution to an API-first platform. Since then, each of the five new releases of Drupal 8 introduced significant web service API improvements.

While I was an early advocate for adding web services to Drupal 8 five years ago, I'm even more certain about it today. Important market trends endorse this strategy, including integration with other technology solutions, the proliferation of new devices and digital channels, the growing adoption of JavaScript frameworks, and more.

In fact, I believe that this functionality is so crucial to the success of Drupal, that for several years now, Acquia has sponsored one or more full-time software developers to contribute to Drupal's web service APIs, in addition to funding different community contributors. Today, two Acquia developers work on Drupal web service APIs full time.

Drupal core's REST API

While Drupal 8.0 shipped with a basic REST API, the community has worked hard to improve its capabilities, robustness and test coverage. Drupal 8.5 shipped 5 months ago and included new REST API features and significant improvements. Drupal 8.6 will ship in September with a new batch of improvements.

One Drupal 8.6 improvement is the move of the API-first code to the individual modules, instead of the REST module providing it on their behalf. This might not seem like a significant change, but it is. In the long term, all Drupal modules should ship with web service APIs rather than depending on a central API module to provide their APIs — that forces them to consider the impact on REST API clients when making changes.

Another improvement we've made to the REST API in Drupal 8.6 is support for file uploads. If you want to understand how much thought and care went into REST support for file uploads, check out Wim Leers' blog post: API-first Drupal: file uploads!. It's hard work to make file uploads secure, support large files, optimize for performance, and provide a good developer experience.

JSON API

Adopting the JSON API module into core is important because JSON API is increasingly common in the JavaScript community.

We had originally planned to add JSON API to Drupal 8.3, which didn't happen. When that plan was originally conceived, we were only beginning to discover the extent to which Drupal's Routing, Entity, Field and Typed Data subsystems were insufficiently prepared for an API-first world. It's taken until the end of 2017 to prepare and solidify those foundational subsystems.

The same shortcomings that prevented the REST API to mature also manifested themselves in JSON API, GraphQL and other API-first modules. Properly solving them at the root rather than adding workarounds takes time. However, this approach will make for a stronger API-first ecosystem and increasingly faster progress!

Despite the delay, the JSON API team has been making incredible strides. In just the last six months, they have released 15 versions of their module. They have delivered improvements at a breathtaking pace, including comprehensive test coverage, better compliance with the JSON API specification, and numerous stability improvements.

The Drupal community has been eager for these improvements, and the usage of the JSON API module has grown 50% in the first half of 2018. The fact that module usage has increased while the total number of open issues has gone down is proof that the JSON API module has become stable and mature.

As excited as I am about this growth in adoption, the rapid pace of development, and the maturity of the JSON API module, we have decided not to add JSON API as an experimental module to Drupal 8.6. Instead, we plan to commit it to Drupal core early in the Drupal 8.7 development cycle and ship it as stable in Drupal 8.7.

GraphQL

For more than two years I've advocated that we consider adding GraphQL to Drupal core.

While core committers and core contributors haven't made GraphQL a priority yet, a lot of great progress has been made on the contributed GraphQL module, which has been getting closer to its first stable release. Despite not having a stable release, its adoption has grown an impressive 200% in the first six months of 2018 (though its usage is still measured in the hundreds of sites rather than thousands).

I'm also excited that the GraphQL specification has finally seen a new edition that is no longer encumbered by licensing concerns. This is great news for the Open Source community, and can only benefit GraphQL's adoption.

Admittedly, I don't know yet if the GraphQL module maintainers are on board with my recommendation to add GraphQL to core. We purposely postponed these conversations until we stabilized the REST API and added JSON API support. I'd still love to see the GraphQL module added to a future release of Drupal 8. Regardless of what we decide, GraphQL is an important component to an API-first Drupal, and I'm excited about its progress.

OAuth 2.0

A web services API update would not be complete without touching on the topic of authentication. Last year, I explained how the OAuth 2.0 module would be another logical addition to Drupal core.

Since then, the OAuth 2.0 module was revised to exclude its own OAuth 2.0 implementation, and to adopt The PHP League's OAuth 2.0 Server instead. That implementation is widely used, with over 5 million installs. Instead of having a separate Drupal-specific implementation that we have to maintain, we can leverage a de facto standard implementation maintained by others.

API-first ecosystem

While I've personally been most focused on the REST API and JSON API work, with GraphQL a close second, it's also encouraging to see that many other API-first modules are being developed:

  • OpenAPI, for standards-based API documentation, now at beta 1
  • JSON API Extras, for shaping JSON API to your site's specific needs (aliasing fields, removing fields, etc)
  • JSON-RPC, for help with executing common Drupal site administration actions, for example clearing the cache
  • … and many more
Conclusion

Hopefully, you are as excited for the upcoming release of Drupal 8.6 as I am, and all of the web service improvements that it will bring. I am very thankful for all of the contributions that have been made in our continued efforts to make Drupal API-first, and for the incredible momentum these projects and initiatives have achieved.

Special thanks to Wim Leers (Acquia) and Gabe Sullice (Acquia) for contributions to this blog post and to Mark Winberry (Acquia) and Jeff Beeman (Acquia) for their feedback during the writing process.

Classic WTF: Flawless Compilation

The Daily WTF -

Just today I was joking with my co-workers: I had written software for which we had no viable test hardware, but the code compiled, therefore I was done. The difference is I was joking… --Remy (Originally)

Back in the heady days of Internet speculation, the giant retailer JumboStores contracted with Fred’s software company, TinyWeb, to develop the region’s first web-based supermarket. Customers would be able to assemble carts online and receive their groceries the next day.

The virtual supermarket had to communicate with JumboStores’s inventory system in real-time. The former was bleeding-edge web technology, the latter a cobweb-laden mainframe with no external point of access.

“How will we get around this?” Fred asked early in the specification process.

“We can stage an intermediate server.” Nick, a programmer from JumboStores IT, assured him around a mouthful of doughnut. “You guys send your requests there, we’ll write software to forward them to the mainframe and back.”

Fred was optimistic. Both companies were *nix shops; the JumboStores IT department were his geek kindred. Equally optimistic, JumboStores management scheduled a live media demo several months out, well after the estimated project completion date.

Deadlines slipped, as they are wont to do. The week before the big demo, the online supermarket still wasn’t ready. TinyWeb had implemented the website and database back-end, but JumboStores’ relay software lagged behind. At the urging of multiple strata of nervous managers, Fred took an emergency trip to JumboStores to investigate.

“We don’t know, man, we just don’t know.” The confident Nick of months prior shook now, leading Fred to his cubicle. “We coded the application. We debugged until it compiled without errors. When we run it- core dump!” He threw up his hands, then dropped into his swivel chair. “We’ve been pestering IBM support, but they haven’t been very helpful.”

“Well, why would they be?” Fred frowned, pausing at the cube threshold. “I mean, who knows what might be wrong with the code?”

“Nothing’s wrong with it. It compiles!”

“So? It could still have errors.”

Nick swiveled around to face him. “Dude. It compiles.

Fred faltered in the wake of Nick’s earnest insistence. “That… doesn’t mean the code is perfect.” He all but fell into the spare chair presented to him. “How do I explain this?” Am I actually trying to explain this? To a programmer? “Let’s say you’re building an engine.”

“This isn’t an engine,” Nick said. “It just passes-“

“No, a car engine! OK? You have all the parts spread out on the desk here.” He waved his arm out over a layer of branded cube toys and post-it notes. “You’ve never built an engine from scratch before, but you have a blueprint with pictures and directions, so you grab your wrench and your welder and whatever, and go to town. At the end, all the parts get used up, and the result looks vaguely engine-like. Still, would you expect to drop it under the hood and have it start up flawlessly the first time you turn over the ignition?”

Nick stared. “I… don’t see what this has to do with anything.”

Fred refrained from smacking his forehead. “Uh, OK. Forget the engine. It’s like sheet music. Just because all the dots are on the staff doesn’t mean it’s the song you want.“

“Dude! The compiler would bug out if there were any problems.” Nick graciously omitted the Duh.

Fred took one last chance. “No- it’s like, if you were building a house. Just because all the parts fit together doesn’t mean it will stand up.”

Nick’s face brightened. “It’s like the home inspector! I see what you mean."

“If that works for you…” Fred said, carefully.

After long consideration, Fred took the intermediate server back home to TinyWeb for some down-to-the-wire recoding, resulting in a flawless demo for the press. JumboStores was delighted.

With their collaboration at an end, Fred wondered how JumboStores IT would ever manage on their own.

[Advertisement] BuildMaster allows you to create a self-service release management platform that allows different teams to manage their applications. Explore how!

ESO's Very Large Telescope Now Delivers Images Sharper Than Hubble

Slashdot -

ffkom shares an excerpt from a press release via the European Southern Observatory: ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) has achieved first light with a new adaptive optics mode called laser tomography -- and has captured remarkably sharp test images of the planet Neptune, star clusters and other objects. The pioneering MUSE instrument in Narrow-Field Mode, working with the GALACSI adaptive optics module, can now use this new technique to correct for turbulence at different altitudes in the atmosphere. It is now possible to capture images from the ground at visible wavelengths that are sharper than those from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The combination of exquisite image sharpness and the spectroscopic capabilities of MUSE will enable astronomers to study the properties of astronomical objects in much greater detail than was possible before.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Amazee Labs: Recap Pt.2: Drupal Dev Days Lisbon 2018

Drupal Planet -

Recap Pt.2: Drupal Dev Days Lisbon 2018 Vijay Dubb Thu, 07/19/2018 - 10:49

Day three Today, my friends, we’re going to Change the World...

Rachel Lawson presented day three’s keynote. It was a really good session as it showed how everyone who attended, has contributed in some way to Drupal, as well as how “Drupal changes the world”. It started by “Meeting Sami”, a 10-year-old boy from Mosul, Iraq, who was captured (along with his brother) by ISIS. He was held captive for three and a half years, after which he was sent to a refugee camp. While in the camp, it was the Warchild charity that provided support, activities, education, and most importantly, ended up reuniting Sami and his brother with his family.

Now, you’re probably wondering what any of this has to do with Drupal? I know, I also did, but it became apparent that Warchild recently switched to using Drupal, making use of several modules. Rachel asked the audience to stand up, if they had made a contribution to modules used by Warchild, including paragraph and media. Almost half the room did, but I didn’t. She then went on to ask about other contributions that people in the audience had made. This time, it related to anything from documentation, to hosting meetups, and even attending camps.

By the end of the session, everyone in the room was standing, including me. It felt good to know that I had contributed in some way. During the question and answer session, the issue of becoming a member of the Drupal Association was raised, as well as the importance of doing so. Membership empowers the Drupal community to be able to do more things that are requested by users, which in turn makes a transformational difference.


“If you don’t push yourself and just go with things, then you’ll never get the amazing things.” - Rachel Lawson

Watch session

Drupal 9: Decoupled by design?

Both Preston So and Lauri Eskola gave a session on decoupling Drupal, as well as the direction in which it is going. Anyone who has been working with Drupal should know that the idea of decoupling Drupal has been around for some time. Among the reasons for doing this, is that developers are free to choose any technology they want for the frontend. It’s clear that Drupal 9 will continue to use Twig, but with support client-side rendering with an API first approach. Another point was that editors prefer the non-decoupled approach, which raises the questions, “Who is requesting this? Is it the clients or developers?”

Watch session

The future of Drupal in numbers

One of the most interesting and debatable sessions I attended was presented by Nemanja Drobnjak. Similar to the first keynote session, this session was about comparing Drupal from 18 months ago, with its current state. This presentation could have been perceived as very pessimistic, especially when seeing the numbers compared to other major CMS’s like WordPress. He also referred to the compare PHP frameworks blog.

All the data in the presentation had clearly been researched, so it was rather shocking to hear Nemanja predict that Drupal could go out of use within 15 years if the current trends continue. A few suggestions to prevent this were made. From improving documentation to Drupal directly targeting the education sector. This session drew a lot of questions. Firstly, “Why compare Drupal to Wordpress?”. I agree completely. It's about who is using it and benefiting from it. It reminded me of the blog post I read in which Vue.js passed React.js in the number of people who have 'starred' it on Github. Basically, it doesn’t mean that React is dying and Vue is now the norm. Both have different purposes and uses, just like, for example, Drupal and Wordpress.

Another question raised was, with Decoupled sites becoming more popular, “Can a crawler detect the backend?”. Maybe the data wasn't 100% correct.

Day four An update on Drupal 8.6

The day four keynote session was presented by Gábor Hojtsy, who gave a short speech about the upcoming Drupal update. He then moved onto how we could help with several initiatives, both at Drupal Dev Days and in general, including helping with Admin UI and documentation.

Watch session

Contribute, contribute, contribute! Yes!!!

Having put my Windows issues on the back burner, it was time to get the admin UI demo to work. I went over to the Admin UI innovation table where I met Lauri Eskola, Daniel Wehner, and Volker Killesreiter, all of whom helped me try to get the site working. Turns out it was because of an outdated module, so I updated the module, created a pull request and boom, my first ever contribution to Drupal was made. I then spent the rest of the day looking at the code and getting to grips with how it worked.

I was then assigned my first issue, which took some time to complete as I was still getting used to the code base. But nonetheless, I was able to fix the issue and contribute some more to the initiative. I really like how everything is broken into small issues, meaning that a single person isn't completing a large issue by themselves. It is clear that Drupal can only be maintained if people contribute back to the project and/or community.

It is never too late to contribute! Even though Drupal has been around for almost 20 years, it still relies heavily on people to contribute and come up with innovative ideas. If you are looking to contribute, but don’t know how I can suggest you take a look at the Drupal development and strategic initiatives.

Having heard the word “contribute” several times, it would have been great to hear someone repeatedly say the word, as Steve Balmer did - "developers".

Day five Quo Vadis, Free Software?

The final keynote session, by Rui Seabra, was about free software. He shared thoughts on how we should have the freedom to run software as we wish, make changes to the software to make it fit for your purpose, and distribute both the original and modified version. It was clear that as users of so-called “free software”, we have a misconception about what we think is free. Rui also went on to talk about how we can help protect the internet, especially from the EU’s copyright directive. I did find the joke about the “[fill in] sucks” reference to Windows, very amusing.

Free software is everywhere, and people are forgetting that the freedom of sharing is a quintessential part of the evolution and moving forward together. “If we didn't share we wouldn't have knowledge, technology, and hardware we use today.” - Rui Seabra

Watch session

Progressive decoupling - the why and the how

The final session I attended was my colleague Blazej Owczarczyk’s talk, where he explained everything about progressive decoupling. One of his key points was that you should only decouple where it makes sense. Blazej showed some cool and interesting new features available in EcmaScript 6/7. We also learnt about the new await/async function in EcmaScript 8, which I found to very cool and cannot wait to start using. It was then time to move on and discuss how we could use these new features in our current Drupal sites.

By installing dependencies, defining a dynamic library and running a web server, you are able to create a decoupled environment for any technology of your choice. Two things I really liked about the session was 1) Blazej asking the audience to tweet a thanks to our very own Philipp Melab for the GraphQL module, and 2) the bonus question, which resulted in more questions from the audience. Way to go Blazej, we’re very proud of you here at Amazee Labs.


 

Watch session

The rest of the day I spent contributing more to the Admin UI initiative.

Many thanks

I would like to take this opportunity to thank:

Ruben Teijeiro for being so helpful throughout the week and introducing me to several people.

Christophe Jossart for not only helping me with my installation issue but for being great company and showing me around Lisbon.

Lauri Eskola, Daniel Wehner, and Volker Killesreiter for the introduction to Admin UI, which helped me find the issue as to why I couldn’t set up the site on my machine and finally allowing me to help contribute to the great initiative.

Finally, to all the sponsors, speakers, organiser, and volunteers, a huge thank you for a spectacular week, great evening social events, and for making my first ever Dev Days an amazing one. I hope to see you all at the next one.

Links

Chinese Space Official Seems Unimpressed With NASA's Lunar Gateway

Slashdot -

schwit1 shares a report from Behind The Black: At a science workshop in Europe this week, Chinese space officials made it clear that they found the concept of NASA Lunar Orbiting Platform-Gateway (LOP-G) to be unimpressive and uninteresting. Moreover, they said that while it appears we will be delaying our landings on the Moon for at least a decade because of LOP-G, they will be focused on getting and building a research station on the surface, right off the bat. [From a report via Ars Technica:] "Overall, [Pei Zhaoyu, who is deputy director of the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration], does not appear to be a fan of NASA's plan to build a deep space gateway, formally known as the Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway, at a near-rectilinear halo orbit. Whereas NASA will focus its activities on this gateway away from the Moon, Pei said China will focus on a 'lunar scientific research station.' Another slide from Pei offered some thoughts on the gateway concept, which NASA intends to build out during the 2020s, delaying a human landing on the Moon until the end of the decade at the earliest. Pei does not appear to be certain about the scientific objectives of such a station, and the deputy director concludes that, from a cost-benefit standpoint, the gateway would have 'lost cost-effectiveness.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Russian Shipwreck Allegedly Carrying $130 Billion In Gold Has Been Rediscovered

Slashdot -

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Popular Mechanics: A salvage company has located the remains of a Russian warship lost during the the Russo-Japanese War. The battle-damaged cruiser Dmitrii Donskoi was scuttled off the coast of Korea in 1905, reportedly carrying a cargo of gold worth an estimated $130 billion in today's dollars. An international consortium of companies plans to salvage the gold. According to the Telegraph, the Donskoi was found less than a mile off the coast of Ulleung island, at a depth of 1,423 feet in the Sea of Japan. A submersible descended to the wreck and captured an image of the ship's name on the stern in the Cyrillic alphabet. The South Korean Shinil Group, which discovered the wreck, plans to recover the gold sometime later this year with help from companies in China, Canada, and the U.K. At the time of her sinking Donskoi was reportedly carrying 5,500 boxes of gold bars and 200 tons of gold coins with a street value today of $130 billion. That's more than twice Russia's 2017 defense budget, which was $61 billion. If the treasure does materialize, the Russian government will receive half of the recovered amount. The money that's not going to Russia will reportedly be invested in a railroad line linking North Korea, South Korea, and Russia. A small percentage (10%) will also be invested in tourism projects on Ulleungdo Island, including a museum dedicated to the vessel.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Leaked Documents Show Facebook's 'Threshold' For Deleting Pages, Groups

Slashdot -

Facebook has repeatedly referenced to lawmakers a "threshold" that must be reached before the platform decides to ban a particular page for violating the site's policies, but it hasn't discussed its guidelines publicly. Motherboard has obtained internal Facebook documents laying out what this threshold is for multiple types of different content, including some instances of hate speech. From the report: One Facebook moderator training document for hate speech says that for Pages -- Facebook's feature for sections dedicated to, say, a band, organization, public figure, or business -- the Page admin has to receive 5 "strikes" within 90 days for the Page itself to be deleted. Alternatively, Facebook moderators are told to remove a Page if at least 30 percent of the content posted by other people within 90 days violates Facebook's community standards. A similar 30 percent-or-over policy exists for Facebook Groups, according to the document. In a similar vein, another hate speech document says that a profile should be taken down if there are 5 or more pieces of content from the user which indicate hate propaganda, photos of the user present with another identifiable leader, or other related violations. Although the documents obtained by Motherboard were created recently, Facebook's policies change regularly, so whether these exact parameters remain in force is unclear. Of course this still depends on moderators identifying and labeling posts as violating to reach that threshold. [...] Another document focused on sexual content says moderators should unpublish Pages and Groups under the basis of sexual solicitation if there are over 2 "elements," such as the Page description, title, photo, or pinned post, that include either explicit solicitation of nude imagery, or, if the page is more subtle, includes either a method of contact or a location. This slide again reiterates the over 30 percent and 5 admin posts rules found in the hate speech document.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Corning's New Gorilla Glass 6 Will Let Your Phones Survive 15 Drops

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Corning just announced its most durable glass yet: Gorilla Glass 6. "The company says that the glass will survive up to 15 drops from a one meter height and can be 'up to two times better' than Gorilla Glass 5," reports The Verge. From the report: As phones get slimmer and have ever sleeker glass displays, reports have appeared that the slimness may actually cancel out the improvements in new iterations of Gorilla Glass, since thinner glass is weaker glass, even if it's become stronger. Still Corning argues that sleek edge-to-edge displays have actually led to stronger smartphones. Sometimes, in smartphones of previous years, the bezel would crack first, then leading to a weakness in the glass. There's also a tradeoff between drop resistance and scratch resistance, which Corning has admitted to in the past. Corning says that Gorilla Glass 6 will have the same amount of scratch resistance as previous generations. So although the company claims the new generation of Gorilla Glass is "better," you shouldn't expect new phones made with the glass to be more scratch-resistant. The first devices to feature Gorilla Glass 6 are expected to arrive near the end of the year.

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eBay Is Conducting a 'Mass Layoff' In the Bay Area

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eBay is planning to slash nearly 300 jobs from Bay Area locations by July 20, calling the cuts a "mass layoff." Those being laid off were informed at the end of June, reports The Mercury News. The San Jose-based company estimated that it would eliminate 224 jobs in San Jose, 41 in San Francisco, and five in Brisbane. From the report: "This action is expected to be permanent," eBay stated in the Employment Development Department filing. "No affected employee has any bumping rights." Over the one-year period that ended in March, eBay lost $1.64 billion on revenues of $9.84 billion, according to information posted on the Yahoo Finance site. During the first quarter that ended March 31, eBay earned $407 million on revenues of $2.58 billion. Compared to the year-ago first quarter, profits were down 60.7 percent and revenue rose 12 percent.

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DeepMind, Elon Musk and Others Pledge Not To Make Autonomous AI Weapons

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An anonymous reader quotes a report from Engadget: Yesterday, during the Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence, the Future of Life Institute announced that more than 2,400 individuals and 160 companies and organizations have signed a pledge, declaring that they will "neither participate in nor support the development, manufacture, trade or use of lethal autonomous weapons." The signatories, representing 90 countries, also call on governments to pass laws against such weapons. Google DeepMind and the Xprize Foundation are among the groups who've signed on while Elon Musk and DeepMind co-founders Demis Hassabis, Shane Legg and Mustafa Suleyman have made the pledge as well. "Thousands of AI researchers agree that by removing the risk, attributability and difficulty of taking human lives, lethal autonomous weapons could become powerful instruments of violence and oppression, especially when linked to surveillance and data systems," says the pledge. It adds that those who sign agree that "the decision to take a human life should never be delegated to a machine." "I'm excited to see AI leaders shifting from talk to action, implementing a policy that politicians have thus far failed to put into effect," Future of Life Institute President Max Tegmark said in a statement. "AI has huge potential to help the world -- if we stigmatize and prevent its abuse. AI weapons that autonomously decide to kill people are as disgusting and destabilizing as bioweapons, and should be dealt with in the same way."

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IBM Wants $167 Million From Groupon Over Alleged Patent Infringement

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On Monday, IBM asked a jury to award the company $167 million in a lawsuit against deals site Groupon for using patented technology without authorization. The patents involve e-commerce technology that had already been licensed to Amazon, Facebook, and Alphabet for between $20 million and $50 million per company. "Most big companies have taken licenses to these patents," IBM's lawyer, John Desmarais, said. "Groupon has not. The new kid on the block refuses to take responsibility for using these inventions." Reuters reports: Groupon lawyer J. David Hadden argued that IBM was overreading the scope of its patents and claiming ownership of building blocks of the internet. "A key question for you in this case is whether these patents cover the world wide web," Hadden told jurors. "They do not and that is because IBM did not invent the world wide web." An IBM executive is expected to testify during the two-week trial about licensing deals with technology companies like Amazon and Google, providing a rare glimpse into IBM's efforts to derive revenue from its large patent portfolio. The Armonk, New York-based company invests heavily in research and development and has secured more U.S. patents than any other company for the past 25 years.

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Hackers Account For 90 Percent of Login Attempts At Online Retailers

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Hackers account for 90% of of e-commerce sites' global login traffic, according to a report by cyber security firm Shape Security. They reportedly use programs to apply stolen data acquired on the dark web -- all in an effort to login to websites and grab something of value like cash, airline points, or merchandise. Quartz reports: These attacks are successful as often as 3% of the time, and the costs quickly add up for businesses, Shape says. This type of fraud costs the e-commerce sector about $6 billion a year, while the consumer banking industry loses out on about $1.7 billion annually. The hotel and airline businesses are also major targets -- the theft of loyalty points is a thing -- costing a combined $700 million every year. The process starts when hackers break into databases and steal login information. Some of the best known "data spills" took place at Equifax and Yahoo, but they happen fairly regularly -- there were 51 reported breaches last year, compromising 2.3 billion credentials, according to Shape. Taking over bank accounts is one way to monetize stolen login information -- in the US, community banks are attacked far more than any other industry group. According to Shape's data, that sector is attacked more than 200 million times each day. Shape says the number of reported credential breaches was roughly stable at 51 last year, compared with 52 in 2016. The best way consumers can minimize these attacks is by changing their passwords.

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