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Venezuela Says Its Cryptocurrency Raised $735 Million -- But It's a Farce

Slashdot -

Earlier this week, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro claimed that a new state-sponsored cryptocurrency called the petro raised $735 million on the first day of its sale. ArsTechnica dives deep on the matter to suggest that it's all a farce. From the report: The government hasn't provided any way to independently verify that $735 million figure. And there's reason to doubt almost everything the Venezuelan government has said about the project. Moreover, there's little reason to believe that the petro will maintain its value over time. The Venezuelan government has portrayed petro tokens as backed by Venezuela's vast oil reserves, but they're not. The government is merely promising to accept tax payments in petros at a government-determined exchange rate linked to oil prices. Given the Venezuelan government's history of manipulating exchange rates, experts say investors should be wary of this arrangement. Moreover, the petro scheme has been opposed by opposition legislators in Venezuela's opposition-controlled legislature. They say that the Maduro government is essentially issuing oil-backed debt, and legally that can't be done without approval from the legislature. If Maduro falls from power in the future, his successor might refuse to honor petro redemptions.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Elevated Third: WATCH E3 Takeaways: Drupal 8 Works for SaaS

Drupal Planet -

WATCH E3 Takeaways: Drupal 8 Works for SaaS WATCH E3 Takeaways: Drupal 8 Works for SaaS Zach Ettelman Thu, 02/22/2018 - 12:29

In this edition of E3 Takeaways Business Development Strategist, Zach, talks Drupal 8 and why its flexible workflows, ability to integrate, and internationalization suite of modules work so well for the SaaS industry.

 

 

Hello there, I'm Zach Ettelman, Business Development Strategist here at Elevated Third. Today I'm going to talk about why Drupal is a good fit for software as a service companies. 

 

Takeaway #1: The old adage "content is king" is not dead and that means companies are still having to create a ton of content. With so many content cooks in the kitchen that means there are many approval layers to even get the smallest piece of content onto your site. Thanks to Drupal's content authorization workflow, we can personalize and customize it to meet the needs of your team. 

 

Takeaway #2: In today's digital world, virtually every SaaS organization is serving an international audience. Thanks to Drupal 8's internationalization suite of modules, we can now translate and localize content based on where the product's services are available for your offerings. 

 

Takeaway #3: SaaS companies leverage a multitude of tools in their digital arsenal to get daily business operations done, including CRM, marketing automation tools, and inventory management tools. Drupal 8 specifically is built API first making it easy to handle all these third-party integrations. Thanks to contributed modules and custom modules, we can keep up with your daily business operations and connect them to your digital website. 

Need more about Drupal 8? Download our D8 whitepaper. 

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Disney Loses in Redbox Copyright Row

Slashdot -

Disney has lost a bid to stop movie rental company Redbox from reselling download codes for its films. From a report: Redbox bought Disney movies on DVD to offer for rental in its kiosks. The DVDs were often bundled with a code to download a copy of the film. Disney requested an injunction to stop the practice, saying that Redbox had no business arrangement with it. A California federal judge accused Disney of "copyright misuse." Redbox rents and sells movies via tens of thousands of automated kiosks that dispense DVD and Blu-ray discs.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Hook 42: January Accessibility (A11Y) Talks

Drupal Planet -

In January, we were happy to have Ashley Bischoff as our guest speaker. Ashley talked about embracing plain language for better accessibility. Ashley is an accessibility expert and copy editor for The Paciello Group.

Writing reports and documentation is nothing new for many of us — we write them all the time. But even though we may do our best to write clearly, those who receive our reports and documentation might not be as familiar with accessibility as we are.

At the end of the day, no matter how technically correct a document may be, our words won't do much good if those who are reading them can't understand what we're trying to say. But writing isn't a black box — there are straightforward techniques that we can use to help ensure that our writing remains accessible.

 

OSTraining: Check Out the New Page Builder in Drupal 8.5!

Drupal Planet -

The Release Candiate version of Drupal 8.5 was released today.

At this point we can see the final features that will be in the official release of 8.5 on March 7.

In this blog post, I'll give you an introduction to 3 of the main new features you can look forward to in 8.5.

This is "Day 1" post giving my quick reactions. We'll improve and expand on this post in the days before the final release.

Drupal blog: Drupal 8.5.0-rc1 is available for testing

Drupal Planet -

The first release candidate for the upcoming Drupal 8.5.0 release is now available for testing. Drupal 8.5.0 is expected to be released March 7.

Download Drupal-8.5.0-rc1

8.5.x makes the Media module available for all, improves migrations significantly, stabilizes the Content Moderation and Settings Tray modules, serves dynamic pages faster with BigPipe enabled by default, and introduces the new experimental Layout Builder module. The release includes several very important fixes for workflows of content translations and supports PHP 7.2. Finally, 8.5.0-rc1 also includes the same security updates that are provided in 8.4.5.

What does this mean to me? For Drupal 8 site owners

Drupal 8.4.5, a security update and the final release of the 8.4.x series, has also been released this week. 8.4.x sites should update immediately to 8.4.5, but going forward, 8.4.x will receive no further releases following 8.5.0, and sites should prepare to update from 8.4.x to 8.5.x in order to continue getting bug and security fixes. Use update.php to update your 8.4.x sites to the 8.5.x series, just as you would to update from (e.g.) 8.4.2 to 8.4.3. You can use this release candidate to test the update. (Always back up your data before updating sites, and do not test updates in production.)

If you're an early tester who is already running 8.5.0-alpha1 or 8.5.0-beta1, you should update to 8.5.0-rc1 immediately. 8.5.0-rc1 includes security fixes (the same fixes that were released in Drupal 8.4.5).

Site owners should also take note of the fact that Drupal 8's support for PHP 5 will end in one year, in March 2019. PHP 7.2 is now the best recommended PHP version to use with Drupal 8.

For module and theme authors

Drupal 8.5.x is backwards-compatible with 8.4.x. However, it does include internal API changes and API changes to experimental modules, so some minor updates may be required. Review the change records for 8.5.x, and test modules and themes with the release candidate now.

For translators

Some text changes were made since Drupal 8.4.0. Localize.drupal.org automatically offers these new and modified strings for translation. Strings are frozen with the release candidate, so translators can now update translations.

For core developers

All outstanding issues filed against 8.4.x were automatically migrated to 8.5.x. Future bug reports should be targeted against the 8.5.x branch. 8.6.x will remain open for new development during the 8.5.x release candidate phase. The 8.5.x branch will be subject to release candidate restrictions, with only critical fixes and certain other limited changes allowed.

Your bug reports help make Drupal better!

Release candidates are a chance to identify bugs for the upcoming release, so help us by searching the issue queue for any bugs you find, and filing a new issue if your bug has not been reported yet.

Uber Will 'Invest Aggressively' In India And Southeast Asia, CEO Says

Slashdot -

Pranav Dixit, writing for BuzzFeed News: Dara Khosrowshahi, Uber's CEO of six months, said on Thursday that the ride-hailing service would continue to invest aggressively in both Southeast Asia and India, where the company is losing money and faces strong competition from local players like Grab and Ola. Uber has been slow to expand its presence in India and Southeast Asia, allowing competitors to quickly gain ground. Singapore's Grab, for instance, claimed to have 95% of the country's ride-hailing market share last year. And Ola, Uber's Indian rival, currently operates in 110 cities against Uber's 29 cities. Ola does 1 billion rides annually, compared to Uber, which announced in mid-2017 that it completed 500 million total rides in the country in its first four years of operations. "We expect to lose money in Southeast Asia and expect to invest aggressively in terms of marketing, subsidies, etc.," Khosrowshahi told reporters in India, which is Uber's fastest-growing market outside the United States, and where he is currently on his first official tour. While Uber's India operation is not yet profitable, it does account for 10% of Uber's rides globally.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Intel, Microsoft, Dell, HP and Lenovo Expect PCs With Fast 5G Wireless To Ship Next Year

Slashdot -

Intel, along with Dell, HP, Lenovo, and Microsoft said Thursday that the companies expect the first 5G Windows PCs to become available during the second half of 2019. From a report: That's about the same time that Intel plans to begin shipping its XMM 8000 commercial modems, marking the company's entrance into the 5G market. Intel will show off a prototype of the new 5G connected PC at Mobile World Congress show in Barcelona. In addition the company will demonstrate data streaming over the 5G network. At its stand, Intel said that it will also show off eSIM technology -- the replacement for actual, physical SIM cards -- and a thin PC running 802.11ax Wi-Fi, the next-gen Wi-Fi standard.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Aten Design Group: Capturing Webhooks in Drupal 8

Drupal Planet -

When using traditional APIs your application is typically requesting or pulling data from an external service, requiring a request for fresh data if you want to see recent changes. When using webhooks, that process is reversed: data is pushed from an external service in real-time keeping your application more up to date and your project running more efficiently. Here are a few examples:

  • Facebook - Receive an alert anytime a message is read
  • Stripe - Get alerted anytime a transaction comes through
  • Eventbrite - Get alerted if an event is created or updated

This of course is not an exhaustive list; you'll need to check the application you are integrating with to see if they are implementing webhooks. A Google search like "Stripe Webhooks" is a good first step.

Implementing a webhook in your application requires defining a URL to which your webhook can push data. Once defined, the URL is added to the application providing the webhook. In Drupal 8, controllers are a straightforward way to define a path. See the complete code for an example.

When the webhook is fired it hits the defined URL with applicable data. The data that comes from a webhook is called the payload. The payload is often a JSON object, but be sure to check the application’s documentation to see exactly what you should be expecting. Capturing the payload is straightforward using the Request object available in a controller like this:

public function capture(Request $request) { $payload = $request->getContent(); }

If your payload is empty, you can always try some vanilla PHP:

$payload = file_get_contents("php://input"); Inspecting the Payload

Debugging webhooks can be a bit challenging if you are developing locally because your local environment typically does not have a public URL. Further, some webhooks require that the receiving URL implement SSL, which can also present challenges locally. The following options can help you navigate debugging webhooks locally.

Easiest

When capturing the payload, you can log it in Drupal. This option requires pushing your code up to a publicly available URL (a dev or staging environment).

$this->logger->debug('<pre>@payload</pre>', ['@payload' => $payload]);

Once you know what the payload looks like, you can copy it, modify it and make your own fake webhook calls locally using Postman. Feel free to checkout the importable Postman example in the repo.

Most Flexible

There is a utility called ngrok that allows you to expose your local environment with a publicly available URL; if you anticipate a lot of debugging it is probably worth the time to set up. Once ngrok is in place, you use the same logging method as above or use XDEBUG or something similar to inspect the payload. Ngrok will give you a unique, public URL which you can register, but which forwards to a server you have running on localhost. You can even use it with a local server that uses vhosts, such as yoursite.test with the command:

ngrok http -host-header=rewrite yoursite.test:80 Capturing and Processing the Payload

I'm a big fan of Drupal's queue system. It allows quick storage of just about anything (including JSON objects) and a defined way to process it later on a CRON run.

In your controller, when the payload comes in, immediately add the payload to your defined queue rather than processing it right away. This will make sure it is always running as efficiently as possible. You can of course process it right away if you choose to do so and skip the rest of this post.

$this->queue->createItem($payload);

Later when the queue runs, you can process the payload and do what you need to do, like create a node. Here is an example from the queue plugin (see ProcessPayloadQueueWorker.php for the full code):

public function processItem($data) { // Decode the JSON that was captured. $decode = Json::decode($data); // Pull out applicable values. // You may want to do more validation! $nodeValues = [ 'type' => 'machine_name_here', 'status' => 1, 'title' => $decode['title'], 'field_custom_field' => $decode['something'], ];   // Create a node. $storage = $this->entityTypeManager->getStorage('node'); $node = $storage->create($nodeValues); $node->save(); }

Once a queue is processed on CRON, the item is removed from the queue. Check out Queue UI module for easy debugging.

Security

As when building any web application, security should be a major consideration. While not an exhaustive list, here are a few things you can do to help make sure your webhook stays secure.

  • Check your service's webhook documentation to see what authentication protocols they provide.
  • Create your own token that only your application and the webhook service know about. If that is not included, do not accept the request. See the authorize method in the controller.
  • Instead of processing the payload and turning it into a node, consider doing an API call back to the service using the ID from payload and requesting the data to ensure its authenticity.
  • You should consider sanitizing content coming from the payload.

Once you implement a Webhook, you'll be hooked! Here's all the code packaged up.

There are of course Drupal contrib modules around webhooks. I encourage you to check them out, but if you have specific use cases or complex needs, rolling your own is probably the way to go.

Amazon May Open Up To Six More Automated Stores This Year

Slashdot -

Amazon may have opened its automated convenience store a year late, but it looks like it's been a pretty big success. From a report: Recode learned that the company plans on opening six more of its Amazon Go stores in 2018. It's not clear where these stores will be located, though Recode reports that more locations are likely in Seattle, and Amazon is in talks with the developer of The Grove in Los Angeles. Amazon Go is billed as the convenience store of the future. There are no checkout lines; you can simply walk in, grab what you want, and leave. You scan in with a smartphone app, and then an AI tracks what you take from the shelves and automatically charges you for them.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Net Neutrality Rules Die on April 23

Slashdot -

The Federal Communications Commission's net neutrality rules will be no more in two months, as the agency takes the final step in removing the regulation from its rule book. From a report: The date -- April 23 -- was revealed today after the Federal Communication Commission's order revoking net neutrality was published in the Federal Register. You can read the full order here. The publication means that a new fight around net neutrality is about to begin. States and other parties will be able to sue over the rules -- some have already gotten started -- and a battle in Congress will kick off over a vote to reverse the order entirely. While that fight likely won't get far in Congress since Republicans by and large oppose net neutrality and control both chambers, there will likely be a long and heated legal battle around the corner for the FCC's new policy. The FCC's new rules are really a lack of rules. Its "Restoring Internet Freedom" order entirely revokes the strong net neutrality regulations put in place back in 2015 and replaces them with basically nothing. Internet providers can now block, throttle, and prioritize content if they want to. The only real rule here is that they have to disclose if they're doing any of this.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Twitter Updates Developer Rules in the Wake of Bot Crackdown

Slashdot -

Twitter is getting serious about its bot problem. From a report: Hours after a massive bot purge that prompted the #TwitterLockOut hashtag to trend, the company is announcing new rules for developers meant to prevent bots from using third-party apps to spread spam. According to the new rules, developers that use Twitter's API will no longer be able to let users: Simultaneously post identical or substantially similar content to multiple accounts. Simultaneously perform actions such as Likes, Retweets, or follows from multiple accounts Use of any form of automation (including scheduling) to post identical or substantially similar content, or to perform actions such as Likes or Retweets, across many accounts that have authorized your app (whether or not you created or directly control those accounts) is not permitted.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

SpaceX Successfully Launches Falcon 9 Carrying Starlink Demo Satellites

Slashdot -

SpaceX has successfully launched a Falcon 9 from SLC-4 at Vandenberg Air Force Base today, its first launch since its successful Falcon Heavy test earlier this month. The launch took off early Wednesday morning, after being rescheduled a couple of times from an initial target of this past weekend. From a report: The launch was primarily designed to bring the PAZ satellite to orbit (which was deployed as planned into a low Earth, sun-synchronous polar orbit), a satellite for a Spanish customer that's designed to provide geocommunications and radar imaging for both government and private commercial customers. This launch had a secondary purpose, however, and one that might ultimately be more important to SpaceX's long-term goals. SpaceX packed two demonstration micro satellites for its planned internet broadband service (which Elon Musk confided via tweet it will call 'Starlink'). These will perform tests required before it's certified to operate the service, which it hopes to use to generate revenue by signing up subscribers to its internet service, which will hopefully be globe-spanning once complete.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Security updates for Thursday

LWN Headlines -

Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (strongswan), Fedora (torbrowser-launcher), openSUSE (libdb-4_5, libdb-4_8, postgresql96, python3-openpyxl, and xv), Red Hat (rh-maven35-jackson-databind), and Ubuntu (kernel, libreoffice, linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux-hwe, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-oem, and linux-lts-xenial, linux-aws).

A Biohacker Regrets Publicly Injecting Himself With CRISPR

Slashdot -

Sarah Zhang, reporting for The Atlantic: When Josiah Zayner watched a biotech CEO drop his pants at a biohacking conference and inject himself with an untested herpes treatment, he realized things had gone off the rails. Zayner is no stranger to stunts in biohacking -- loosely defined as experiments, often on the self, that take place outside of traditional lab spaces. You might say he invented their latest incarnation: He's sterilized his body to "transplant" his entire microbiome in front of a reporter. He's squabbled with the FDA about selling a kit to make glow-in-the-dark beer. He's extensively documented attempts to genetically engineer the color of his skin. And most notoriously, he injected his arm with DNA encoding for CRISPR that could theoretically enhance his muscles -- in between taking swigs of Scotch at a live-streamed event during an October conference. (Experts say -- and even Zayner himself in the live-stream conceded -- it's unlikely to work.) So when Zayner saw Ascendance Biomedical's CEO injecting himself on a live-stream earlier this month, you might say there was an uneasy flicker of recognition. Ascendance Bio soon fell apart in almost comical fashion. The company's own biohackers -- who created the treatment but who were not being paid -- revolted and the CEO locked himself in a lab. Even before all that, the company had another man inject himself with an untested HIV treatment on Facebook Live. And just days after the pants-less herpes treatment stunt, another biohacker who shared lab space with Ascendance posted a video detailing a self-created gene therapy for lactose intolerance. The stakes in biohacking seem to be getting higher and higher. "Honestly, I kind of blame myself," Zayner told me recently. He's been in a soul-searching mood; he recently had a kid and the backlash to the CRISPR stunt in October had been getting to him. "There's no doubt in my mind that somebody is going to end up hurt eventually," he said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Uber Launches 'Express Pool' To Get More Riders To Share Rides

Slashdot -

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Recode: Uber is beginning to roll out a cheaper version of its ride-sharing UberPool service, called Express Pool. The service, which was being tested in Boston and San Francisco, is now available in Los Angeles, San Diego and Denver, and will launch in Miami, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., tomorrow. The idea is that Express Pool, which requires riders to walk a little to meet their driver -- and then again to their destination after being dropped off -- will make shared rides more efficient. If it works, it should both increase the number of rides that drivers can give and also make those shared trips faster for passengers. The new service tests a thesis Uber has long had: Lower prices means higher utilization, and higher utilization means more money -- both for drivers and for Uber. Also that road congestion is bad and the solution is to share more rides. Those are the same theories that sparked the creation of the original UberPool service, which requires a little less walking. But the hope is that this will make it easier to match more passengers and therefore lose less money on each shared ride.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

CodeSOD: Functional IsFunction

The Daily WTF -

Julio S recently had to attempt to graft a third-party document viewer onto an internal web app. The document viewer was from a company which specialized in enterprise “document solutions”, which can be purchased for enterprise-sized licensing fees.

Gluing the document viewer onto their internal app didn’t go terribly well. While debugging, and browsing through the vendor’s javascript, he saw a lot of calls to a function called IsFunction. It was loaded from a “utilities.js”-type do-everything library file. Curious, Julio pulled up the implementation.

function IsFunction ( func ) { var bChk=false; if (func != "undefined") bChk=true; else bChk=false; return bChk; }

I cannot emphasize enough how beautiful this block of code is, by the standards of bad code. There’s so much there. One variable, bChk uses Hungarian notation. Nothing else seems to. It’s a totally superfluous variable, as we could just do return func != "undefined".

Then again why would we even do that? The real beauty, though, is how the name of the function and its implementation have no relationship to each other, and the implementation is utterly useless. For example:

IsFunction("Hello World"); //true IsFunction({spam: "eggs"}); //true IsFunction(function() {}); //true, but it was probably an accident IsFunction(undefined); //true IsFunction("undefined"); //false

Yes, the only time this function returns false is the specific case where you pass it the string “undefined”. Everything else IsFunction apparently. The useless function sounds important. Someone wrote it, probably as a quick attempt at vaguely defensive programming. “I should make sure my inputs are valid”. They didn’t test it. The certainly didn’t think about it. But they wrote it. And then someone else saw the function in use, and said, “Oh… I should probably use that, too.” Somewhere, there’s probably a “Style Guide”, which mandates that, before attempting to invoke a variable that should contain a function, you use IsFunction to confirm it does. It comes up in code reviews, and code has been held from going into production because someone didn't use IsFunction.

And Julio probably is the first person to actually check the implementation since it was first written.

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Bigelow Launching New Company To Sell Private Space Stations

Slashdot -

hyperclocker shares a report from Popular Mechanics: The future of spacecraft in lower Earth orbit (LEO) looks to be an increasingly commercial affair. Bigelow Aerospace, a Las Vegas-based company that builds livable space habitats, has now created a spinoff company known as Bigelow Space Operations (BSO). BSO will market and operate any space habitats that Bigelow sells. The creation of BSO signals that Bigelow is preparing for a future of commercial space living. Recently leaked NASA documents show that the Trump Administration wants to convert the International Space Station into a commercial venture, and BSO is betting that businesses including private scientific ventures and hotels will be interested in creating a profit above the Earth. A prototype Bigelow habitat, the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM), has been connected to the ISS since 2016. It's proven such a successful addition that last year NASA extended its contract for an additional three years. But Bigelow is thinking past the BEAM. In its press release announcing BSO, it highlights its planned launches of the B330-1 and B330-2, spacecraft with 6-person capacity, in 2021.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Commerce Guys: What's the plan for Commerce Kickstart on Drupal 8?

Drupal Planet -

When Commerce Guys raised $5m in 2012 to grow Drupal Commerce and its ecosystem, we invested a big chunk of it in improving our user experience for both customers and administrators. With competing platforms like Shopify and Magento really coming into their own, we knew it was essential to provide a solid out-of-the-box experience. While Drupal Commerce was and is truly unique as an eCommerce framework natively extending and deeply integrated into a CMS, it turns out "flexibility" doesn't pitch nearly as well as a polished demo.

Investing in Drupal Commerce adoption

The product we developed to address that need is Commerce Kickstart, by far the most popular Drupal distribution ever built. I named it such to underscore the fact that we intended it to be an accelerator, both for Drupal Commerce's own adoption but also for newcomers wondering how to demo and develop with the software. At its height, we supported over 13,000 sites reporting in to drupal.org, and we continue to see new sites launch with it to this day.

Building the distribution proved to be a fantastic learning experience. The project drove improvements that worked their way into many contributed modules and Drupal core itself (e.g. contributions to Views, VBO, Entity Reference, Inline Entity Form). Its broad appeal also gave us a platform to invite Technology Partners to invest in the community in a way that Drupal hadn't seen before, many of whom continue to invest in Drupal today (e.g. Authorize.Net, PayPal, Avalara).

It was a ton of work, but Bojan, Jonathan, and their team accomplished everything we set out to do and more. With the release of Commerce 2.0 last fall, we now find ourselves regularly fielding the question, "What's the plan for Commerce Kickstart on Drupal 8?" The reality is, porting Commerce Kickstart as it is to Drupal 8 would be both too costly for our team today and a poor strategy for the way the Drupal market is developing. We're doing something new again.

Accelerating adoption today

Another frequent question we field is, "Why does Drupal Commerce require Composer?" Composer is often highlighted as a barrier to Drupal 8 adoption, and I can understand why. I always felt the same way about drush. I had a UI; why did I need a CLI? I had my process and never had to battle the command line to make sure drush worked, was up to date, and did what I expected. I always felt that way ... until I buckled down and learned it. Now I can't imagine using Drupal without it.

I felt the same about Composer at first, but I was determined to learn how to use it as I learned Drupal 8 and modern PHP in general. I know I'm not the only person suffering from tool fatigue (cf. Dries ; ), so we're doing what we can to help you ease into using Composer on your own terms.

We started by releasing Ludwig last summer, a Drupal project that lets you manage Composer dependencies similarly to the familiar Libraries module. We also expanded and documented a Composer project template that lets you create a new Commerce 2.x site with composer create-project, and we then began planning how to let users customize a project template via the browser while prototyping a GUI for Composer.

With today's release of the new CommerceKickstart.com, developed in partnership with Acro Media (thanks to Shawn McCabe, Mike Hubbard, et al), we're taking the next step!

Commerce Kickstart for Drupal 8

What you'll find there is that Commerce Kickstart has been reimagined for Drupal 8 rather than rebuilt on Drupal 8. The quickest way to get up and running with Drupal Commerce today is not through a distribution as it was 6 years ago, it's through Composer. This is the tool for modern PHP developers, and we see prioritizing Composer while also making it simpler to use as essential to growing Drupal Commerce adoption both from without and within the Drupal community.

While still in its infancy, CommerceKickstart.com presents a form that lets you construct a Composer JSON file ready-made to support Commerce 2.x and the contributed modules you specify. Module categories include payment and shipping providers, product catalog and search tools, data migration, and more. As with Commerce Kickstart 2.x, it features Technology Partners whose modules we have integrated into Commerce 2.x, and we expect the selection to continue expand.

Future plans for the tool include clarifying and improving the tool's usability, adding additional modules and Technology Partners, and evolving it to continue to lower the barrier to entry for new Composer users. If you give it a whirl, we'd love to hear your ideas as well in the Commerce Kickstart issue queue.

Appnovation Technologies: Simple website approach using a Headless CMS: Part 3

Drupal Planet -

Simple website approach using a Headless CMS: Part 3 This is the last post of my quick Headless journey, in the first one I approached the concept of Headless and presented some solutions like Drupal, GraphCMS, Contentful and Cockpit CMS. In the second one, I extended those concepts by detailing Cockpit CMS, mostly due to the simplicity of the admin interface and the way that we de...

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